Gero
Comments 12

Spirited Away to Gero, Japan (Part II.)

In Japanese, frogs make the ‘kero kero’ sound (ribbit ribbit essentially). So in a cute word play, one of Gero’s symbolic animal is the frog–‘gero gero!’ Our second day in Gero was mostly spent exploring the town’s various stores for local snacks–a very worthy endeavor if you’re a foodie because there are endless things to try! We woke up to clouds rolling in from the mountains and some light rain, but fear not since our ryokan had already prepared for us large umbrellas for our day of exploration.

As we made our way towards town, I think the prettiest thing about Gero is how it’s nestled between mountains and still retains much of its traditional small shops look. Of course, we had in mind a couple of things we wanted to eat and buy so without further ado, I’ll let the pictures tell most of the story! (Tip #4 Do not miss Hida Beef buns, ‘gyu-man,’ because meat buns don’t get better than this!)

photo 3

We woke up to our second day in Gero with a cloudy but gorgeously green mountain view

photo 2

Crossing the bridge to explore Gero’s quaint little town

photo 3

Mountains, clouds, and ryokans combined, Gero is such a beautiful city in the summer

photo 4

Gero on a cloudy day has a mysterious cloudy vibe to it, makes me think about Spirited Away all the more!

photo 5

Shirasagi (egret) is one of the symbols of Gero–we saw plenty of shirasagi inspired decorations along our way

photo 1

Entering into the main street

photo 5

Luscious trees lined all the sidewalks, a really nice change of scenery from Tokyo city’s hustle and bustle

photo 1

In Japanese, frogs make the ‘kero kero’ sound (ribbit ribbit essentially). So in a cute word play, another one of Gero’s symbolic animal is the frog–‘gero gero!’

photo 3

A fascinating Pudding Jam we found as we were shopping–you’re suppose to spread it onto your bread kind of like a creamy custard spread!

photo 4

Stopping to snack on some of Gero’s famous Hida Beef buns and ice cream

photo 5

Ramune Ice Cream–the blue soda Japanese kids commonly drink, transformed into a creamy cone of amazingness

photo 1

A bite of the Hida Beef meat bun–if only all meat buns taste phenomenal like this!

photo (19)

Chesnut Cream Dorayaki! Best decision ever

photo 2

Stumbling upon our old friend, Charlie Chaplin!

photo 2

A cute ‘gero gero’ frog decoration spotted engraved on the streets

photo 3

Gero Onsen Town’s little places to rest add to its magical whimsiness

photo 5

A ‘kaeru’ shrine, which is Japanese for frog!

photo 4

A froggy wash basin

photo 1 (29)

Surrounded by mountains and clouds

Even after multiple snacks and unlimited samples at Gero’s many omiyage gift shops, Alex and I were still ready to have lunch after walking around all morning. Tip #5 Check out Gero’s many omiyage stores, and don’t forget to choose one of the many cute frog-decorated ones! Buying omiyage, Japanese for gifts and sweets, is a tradition the Japanese uphold when they visit a new city–afterwards, you share with your coworkers and family the local snacks from wherever you visited. I love it, it’s a delicious custom and perfect excuse to try a bunch of snacks!

Lunch was at a restaurant specialising in Unagi (freshwater eel) and Gyudon, essentially thick slices of sweetly marinated Hida Beef on a bed of rice. Both were absolutely delicious and worth every bite even though we were full half way through the meal! The unagi was tender but crispy on the bottom. With the sweet soy glaze over it, it went amazingly with the rice. I also got a serving of sashimi on the side which was also very good. Alex ordered Gifu Prefecture’s famous Hida Beef on a bed of rice–I think it’s safe to say we both agreed Hida Beef is some of the highest quality beef we’ve ever had.

After lunch, we headed back to Yunoshimakan for some foot onsen and afternoon lounging since it was pouring outside by then. The pitter patter of rain, your feet soaked in hot spring waters, and a gorgeous view? I think Yunoshimakan was telling me to become a poet and write a haiku or something–it was such a lovely experience! But of course, we couldn’t finish our trip without one last dinner. In short, dinner was sukiyaki with Hida Beef, dipped in a raw egg, vegetables soaked in the sweet soy soup base, and some rice with seafood on the side. It truly was an elaborate dinner set that rendered us unmovable afterwards! Ryokans are always known for its traditional dinner sets and when it’s served in your room, there is an art form in the way all the dishes are presented. Beautiful!

photo 1

Stopping for lunch at a restaurant famous for its Grilled Unagi (freshwater eel) and Gyudong 牛丼–a bed of sticky rice topped with sweetly marinated slices of Hida Beef and sweet sauce, yumm!

photo 2 (31)

Grilled unagi with a sweet soy glaze

photo 3 (29)

Close up of the amazing gyudon and the thick slices of Hida Beef

photo 2

Fresh Sashimi

photo 2

Back to the ryokan for some more onsen before the rain–the clouds were rolling in on us!

photo 4

Yunoshimakan’s foot onsen has a gorgeous view of the forest it’s situated in

photo 4

And finally, dinner time again! This is the Sukiyaki set with a full plate of Hida beef

photo 5

A piece of the succulent Hida Beef soaked in raw egg. With a mouthful of rice, it’s the perfect comfort food for a rainy day

photo 1

Sashimi (the pink one is the ootoro–fatty tuna belly that’s the creme de la creme of sashimi!)

photo 3

A collection of seafood delicacies–not for the fainthearted as I had trouble eating some of them, the shell one was a Japanese version of escargot!

photo 5

More delicacies–shrimpe with ikura, grilled sardines, and some type of liver I couldn’t bring myself to try, next time when I’m feeling more lion-hearted!

photo 3

Marinated Fig that was amazing! Really juicy, sweet, and sour

photo 2

Our Sake experimental set

photo 1

Ridiculously sweet Japanese grapes and cantaloupe

photo 4

Morning stroll before heading back to Tokyo city

photo 5

A last view of our ryokan and its surrounding forrest

photo (19)

Ticket from Gero back to Nagoya before going back to Tokyo! The Goldfinch is my current book of choice, it’s a phenomenal read!

Gero was a phenomenal hot springs experience we thoroughly enjoyed. Yunoshimakan has its own rooftop hot spring, which overlooks Gero City, so it was all the more lovely! To be honest, we had never heard of Gero, Japan until we stumbled upon it while researching for a place to go that neither of us have been to. If you’ve traversed across the major Japanese cities like Tokyo, Osaka, and Kyoto, maybe it’s time for some quaint town explorations with amazing mountain views!

And in the spirit of Japanese frog sounds, ‘gero, gero’!

love,
eatprayjade x.

12 Comments

  1. Liver is the best! You have no idea what you’re missing out on 😉 Haven’t tried unagi…yet, but those pictures make it look far more appetizing than what I saw in Tokyo so I might just give it a try if I come across it this time around ^-^ And thanks for stopping by!
    “Just eat everything, don’t count calories, and regret nothing \O/” -Page One Adventures’ Life Motto

    Like

  2. Thanks much for posting this! I had never heard of Gero either and it looks exactly like the kind of place that hubs and I would love. Maybe you say it in part 1 but how did you find the ryokan?

    Like

    • Thanks so much for reading! I use japanican to search up ryokans to stay at in Japan, I definitely recommend it! Gero’s a lovely place that’s a little off the beaten path, but definitely worth the visit!

      Like

      • Thanks for the info! I’ve never used japanican so I’ll have to check it out. Hubby and I *love* “off the beaten path*. So happy for your tip!

        Like

  3. Grace says

    Hi, would you be able to share the place where you had lunch ? Thanks Grace

    Like

    • Hi Grace! I want to say the name of the place we had lunch at was called Michiyazushi Okimuraya (みちや寿司 沖村家). Are you headed to Gero soon? 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s